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Benchmark Problems

This section of eFatigue provides you with complete documentation of a number of benchmark test programs that can be used to learn and evaluate fatigue analysis software. You can use any of the eFatigue analysis tools and then compare your analytical results with actual test data. What better way to learn than by solving real problems with real test data? Each of the benchmark problems provide all the data required for an analysis including loading histories, test geometry, stress analysis and material properties. In addition, a list of suggested exercises is given to guide you through learning and evaluation the fatigue analysis process.

SAE Keyhole Test Program

This test program can help you learn about both constant and variable amplitude fatigue anlaysis using stress-life, strain-life and crack growth methods.

In the 1970's, The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Fatigue Design & Evaluation Committee conducted a test program to provide a set of basic data for determining the validity of various fatigue life estimation and analysis methods. Three variable amplitude load histories were obtained from service strain-time histories submitted by committee members. A test program was conducted using a notched member containing many of the complexities of actual components and incorporating two steels commonly used in the ground vehicle industry. Basic material properties data were generated for both materials. In addition, constant amplitude tests were performed on the "component like" specimen to provide basic data that included processing and manufacturing effects. The variable amplitude test program consisted of 57 individual tests using the three loading histories at several load levels.

SAE Notched Shaft Test Program

This test program can help you learn about multiaxial fatigue constant and variable amplitude fatigue anlaysis using stress-life and strain-life methods.

In the 1980's, The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Fatigue Design & Evaluation Committee conducted an extensive testing program to develop improved evaluation techniques for determining the life of parts subjected to multiaxial stress and strain. A stepped shaft subjected to various combinations of bending and torsion was selected for the experiments. This geometry and size is similar to a wheel spindle in a ground vehicle and contains a typical stress concentration found in many industrial components. A medium carbon steel, SAE 1045, was used for these experiments.